For anything not related to Speeduino, but still about car/bike/boat/engines etc
#65503
Having worked in the chemicals and fuels industry for years, heat content is measured in 100% vapor mixtures. It's how the machine works, it vaporizes the fuel and burns it with pure oxygen.

Because of the pure oxygen experiment method, vapor burning in air will produce less heat - not because of incomplete burn, but because of side reactions with other components of air.

Prove your theory, but stop assuming every established figure is arbitrary.
#65505
Having worked in the chemicals and fuels industry for years, heat content is measured in 100% vapor mixtures. It's how the machine works, it vaporizes the fuel and burns it with pure oxygen.
I had searched before, and could find nothing about this.
Then surely there is some application of burning pure gasoline vapor in industry.
Maybe you know of such applications of pure gasoline vapor? I would really like to know what it, or they are. To learn more about pure gasoline vapor.
I'm waiting for parts, and then I can work on it again.
You see, even your statement raises a lot of questions;
What vapor density do they test it at?
If vapor is weaker, why aren't they testing 14.7 to 1 mixture for max BTU?
See where I'm coming from?
#65506
If the theory statements and increasingly numerous questions continue without the OP attempting to research or understand the answers himself, using the volunteers here as a free research service and then contesting responses—but again without research—I will have to request this thread to be locked or deleted. This thread is too familiar, unproductive and unhealthy for the members and detrimental to the forum, as shown by very similar conduct in the past, IMO. Reference one similar example with every excuse, distraction and zero project progress or resulting facts or data: Yachtsman

@Moderator — minimally, project hardware, software, and progress posts should be in User Projects, and theory discussions in Automotive related, or the entire thread until the project functionally begins.
#65507
The methods for heat determination of fuels is easily searched on the internet. It does not run a certain ratio but uses an excess of oxygen to liberate as much energy as possible.

Frankly it only raises questions if you don’t take the time to search for it and understand it.
#65846
Some of you guys suggest research to find why Tom Ogle did not happen. I've laid out possible reasons why Tom Ogle did happen.
Redirecting my focus onto calorimeters only to discover that gasoline is considered a volatile liquid, and is not vaporized for testing, but small small amounts of liquid are burned in the calorimeter.
If you guys are determined to make me follow your research methods on my project, then I'm going to have to leave.
#65856
That's fine, as scientific method research is the scientific standard, for quality repeatable results. That's why we use them. It's science.

You should understand your statements before posting them as facts. For example, liquid fuel cannot and does not burn.
Casey C wrote:gasoline is considered a volatile liquid, and is not vaporized for testing, but small small amounts of liquid are burned in the calorimeter.
It must be vaporized to burn in the calorimeter, and is how it is tested, not as a combusting liquid. It is 'volatile' meaning it can be vaporized to burn. It is an A <> B reaction of fuel vapor <> oxygen.

That's the whole point of your vaporizer gizmo, as liquid fuel does not burn, yes? ;) Basics. Do your research, use scientific methods for validating your hypothesis. :geek: We will still be here.

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#65859
In this field unfortunately the word vapor has been used loosely.
Some people actually say a carburetor creates vapor, which you and I know, is not true. But actually vapor does surround the droplets, so it is partially true, but definitely not scientific describing the mixture.
I read that gasoline is sprayed into the calorimeter, which is mostly droplets, which is a liquid.
So in the truest, most scientific form, a vapor is where no molecules are touching one another.
A liquid is where all molecules are touching molecules.
My point is that they use a mixture similar to a carburetor mixture to perform the burn, which is not a vapor.
So this looks a job for me cause we need a little controversee.

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