Second firmware live stream happening this weekend: viewtopic.php?f=13&t=3992
For anything you'd like to see added to Speeduino
By dazq
#8741
So what does this device get called? Im sorry to say but transduino sounds very dodgy (possible uk thing but it doesnt sound like it has anything to do with either transmissions or arduino, more like gender changes!!!)
By dazq
#8746
Or if this is the first of many speeduino sister ECU,
Speeduino shift?
Thus the gpio would be speeduino gpio
Etc etc
By Hasse.69
#8769
TRANNYDUINO............

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Sorry open goal , i couldn't control myself.
User avatar
By PSIG
#8784
:lol: Good stuff. Seriously, a good name is critical for folks to find and associate, and Shiftduino is likely better in that regard. It will be immediately apparent that it is associated with Speeduino to anyone that checks it out, and an up-side is that you would get additional feeds to Speeduino from those checking-out Shiftduino, and vice-versa. Different opinions for all things, but Shiftduino just sounds right, is descriptive, and easy to remember for me.

David
ShiftDuino_Logo.png
ShiftDuino_Logo.png (6.38 KiB) Viewed 2904 times
By classified
#8788
PSIG wrote::lol: Good stuff. Seriously, a good name is critical for folks to find and associate, and Shiftduino is likely better in that regard. It will be immediately apparent that it is associated with Speeduino to anyone that checks it out, and an up-side is that you would get additional feeds to Speeduino from those checking-out Shiftduino, and vice-versa. Different opinions for all things, but Shiftduino just sounds right, is descriptive, and easy to remember for me.

David
ShiftDuino_Logo.png
+1 to a good name being critical.

I like the name, but I really don't know why 99.9999999% of projects with an arduino at the core has a duino name.
User avatar
By PSIG
#8798
Basic gear shift selection depends on the transmission design. Most require a physical level to be moved, at least to select basic range, such as Park, Reverse, Neutral, and "Drive" range, due to physical internal hydraulic and mechanical configuration. Most need this due to mechanical stuff like actuating (engaging) the parking pawl that locks the output when parked, and disengaging it in order to drive, although a few designs are entirely electronic control in recent years.

Due to the physical lever, most then have a switched or resistive shift range sensor (ex: Manual Lever Position Sensor) attached to the lever input or shifter mechanism. The input to the controller indicates the range the transmission is in (and sometimes activates reverse lights), so the controller knows what routine to run at that point, and needs to be capable of reading the most common digital and analog signals. Once the trans is selected into "Drive" range, it can be manually selected to a particular gear, or a switched input used (button or paddle switches) to select the desired gear within that range.

Additional inputs, such as selecting OverDrive (OD) gear to enabled or disabled are also common on many models, either with a shifter position or an override "OD" button or switch for the driver. As these overrides are usually temporary, they are commonly software switches activated by a momentary button, with auto-resetting to default ON with the next power cycle. Does that help with the question?

David

Example of an analog gear lever position sensor output. In this case, the specs used on most Ford vehicles for many years. Note "Overdrive" selects the basic range, and specifically allows 3rd and 4th gears, with 4th optional based on the OD button function. Once in "Overdrive" range, operation is automatic for all gears (auto-shift appropriate 1 to 4), and can be manually overridden with additional buttons or paddle switches. So, you could select "Overdrive" or "drive", and shift gears at-will with paddles on your steering wheel :mrgreen: :
MLPS Test Specs.png
MLPS Test Specs.png (43.72 KiB) Viewed 2885 times
User avatar
By PSIG
#8799
classified wrote:... I really don't know why 99.9999999% of projects with an arduino at the core has a duino name.
Yeah, It bugs me a bit also, though I think the tendency is to not only differentiate against other uC types, but to generally imply an achievable DIY project core using a cheap and common module; as-opposed to a very expensive and voodoo-ized (?) commercial or OEM product. I think it invokes a sense of "I could do this". Personally, the only reason I am tolerant of the over-used term, is due to this instant recognition and skill-level categorization of the project type it falls into. Just my 2¢ and thinking out-loud.

David
By classified
#8823
PSIG wrote:
classified wrote:... I really don't know why 99.9999999% of projects with an arduino at the core has a duino name.
Yeah, It bugs me a bit also, though I think the tendency is to not only differentiate against other uC types, but to generally imply an achievable DIY project core using a cheap and common module; as-opposed to a very expensive and voodoo-ized (?) commercial or OEM product. I think it invokes a sense of "I could do this". Personally, the only reason I am tolerant of the over-used term, is due to this instant recognition and skill-level categorization of the project type it falls into. Just my 2¢ and thinking out-loud.

David
Hmmmm I like that thinking. And you could very well be on point. In anycase it still bugs the hell out of me. :D

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